Tuesday, 19 January 2016

Singer 327k Low Shank Feet & Lifting Plate

Hello

Had an enquiry from Paul, asking what  type of feet fit the Singer 327.  Easy, the 327 is a low shank machine so you will be able to fit low shank Singer feet.

For those who don't know, nearly all Singers, especially the early ones were low shank which means the feet are quite short in height as the distance from the machine bed to the where the foot attaches is quite small. The feet measure 1 ins high.

A couple of the later Singers are high shanks (sorry not sure what the model numbers are), none of my machines are high shank but I do have an odd foot to compare the height of a low shank foot.  You can see the difference below.  The high shank foot  measures 1 1/4 ins high.



Just to confuse the situation even more, there is a Slant Shank Singer machine, the 301 was the first one made, this means that the shank on the feet (along with the needlebar) are at an angle, they slant backwards.

Below is a small selection of Singer low shank feet that will fit on the 327K.



One thing on the 327 is that instead of covering the feed dogs to enable you to do free motion embroidery, you lift the needle plate with either of these odd looking things, they both slip underneath the needleplate which disengages the feed dogs.


You will need a darning foot, I used the one off my Singer 221 which also fits the 201.  You could use a darning foot like the clear one below as well, they are much cheaper to buy than the little hopping foot.  The little rectangular plate is for covering the feed dogs on the Singer 221 Featherweight, this is a reproduction one which I got off Ebay, an original, if you could find one would be very expensive, the cheapest one I have seen was £96!


Sorry got side tracked, back to the lifting plates.  It slides under this holding pin, you can raise with a screwdriver or just slide the lifter under it from the right.


  Then the needle plate slides over the top.


The push the bobbin cover back, this will also raise up a bit as well.



Then off you go, the 327 is nice to free motion with, it goes steady away which is what you want.  You might have to adjust the height of the hopping foot, its adjusted by raising or lowering where it attached with the thumb screw.


The other style lifter fits like this.



Both of these lifters do exactly the same job so either will do. 

Helen Howes Sewing Machines have both of these lifting plates on her website http://www.helenhowes-sewingmachines.co.uk/quiltfeet.html  She has a really good selection of feet and machine parts as well.  She is based in the UK but will post world wide (full details on how to order are on her webpage).

I haven't used the 327K since I got the Singer 201 so it was nice to use it again so thanks Paul for your question.

Cheers
Sharon





11 comments:

  1. I don't know anything about the 327K, but this is a very useful post for if I ever come across one! We've got a big new charity shop in my local town and I notice that they are getting sewing machines quite regularly.They had a 438 recently but after a bit of googling I decided it wasn't worth getting (plus I haven't really got time to restore another sewing machine at the moment!).

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    1. Hi Lizzie, although the 327 is a nice machine and has metal gears (which makes it strong) it's not as good as your 201K as they have special hardened steel gears which are super strong. If you need a zig zag then yes, the 327K is fine but don't pay too much for it. Sharon

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  2. Thank you so much for such an informative blog on the low shank feet! I would have to track down one of those lifters as well to do the free motion embroidering. It looks like you have an excellent grasp on that. Have you sewed for long? Thanks again!
    Paul

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    1. Hi Paul, I have added a link to the blog giving details of where you can purchase a lifting plate (don't panic only £2 plus postage). I learnt to sew many moons ago at school (once worked as a professional machinist making posh curtains) but took it up as a hobby again in 2012 when I bought my Featherweight, that's when I got the collecting, blogging and quilting bug! So watch out you never know where your Featherweight will lead you! Bet you can't wait for it to arrive. Cheers Sharon

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  3. Hi Sharon, thank you for that information. I had purchased a plate on eBay yesterday that says it was for a 208. It looked very similar to one you posted so I took a chance. If it doesn't work, she will take it back. I checked the link you posted and if the one I purchased doesn't work, I will purchase from Helen. That is very interesting that you used to make posh curtains. You certainly sew wonderfully and create beautiful quilts! My featherweight just arrived and I have to take it out after running some errands. Have a great day! Thanks again!
    Paul

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  4. Hi Paul, good luck with the Featherweight, what are you going to make with it? I would give it a clean and oil before you use it properly,, also make sure that the electric motor lubrication tubes are full of singer lubrication, don't what ever you do put oil in these tubes. If you want any help with this, my email address is on the side bar of my blog. I could send some links which shows you what to do.
    Have fun
    Sharon

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  5. Hi Sharon, I apologize that it has taken me a while to get back to you. I have been preparing for a snow storm which we are now having. Nothing worse than having to plow 12-24 inches of snow (as forecasted). I just stopped in my local sewing store yesterday while running errands and they will be having a quilting course next month where everything is included. I think that will be my first project! I am nervous but excited as I have never made a quilt. I am going to clean and oil the machine today as I wait for the snow to stop falling. Thank you for offering your help! Perhaps I will email you. I heard the same thing about not putting oil in the motor tubes. The lady at the sewing store yesterday said the opposite. Thanks again for your kindness. - I did purchase a hopping foot and cover plate this week for the featherweight as well and hope to receive them soon. Have a wonderful day!
    Paul

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    1. Hi Paul, hope that you are safe tucked up with your featherweight and not wading through snow drifts. A quilt is a good thing to start with, get yourself a quarter inch foot (April sells them) it will make quilt making much easier. Don't free motion for too long as it can cause the motor to heat up, just do it short bursts and keep checking the motor with your hand, if its hot, stop. I nearly fried my once, oops! but it was fine once it had cooled down.
      Sharon

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  6. I found a box of attachments and manual for a 338, which also uses that black lifting plate you show above. If it hadn't been in the manual, I wouldn't have had a clue what it was, except it had something to do with the feed dogs, I had never heard of a lifting plate. Does the 327 use cams for stitches as well? It would appear the No. 1 cam is the basic zigzag cam, on the 338. It looks like the straight stitch plate for the 338 and 348 are the same size. I don't have a manual for the 348, but I do have a feed dog cover, that looks like it clamps to the general purpose plate.

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    1. Hi Francine, the 327 doesn't have cams, just a lever and stitch width to change it to a zig zag machine. My machine didn't have it's manual, it was only when I managed to find one that I found out that I had the lifting plates already, I wondered what they were for! X

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